+94112396666 | email us | expert connect

Discover Sri Lanka

Explore Sri Lanka's diversity...

Choose an itinerary

Carefully designed itineraries...

Plan day experiences

Make the most of every day...

Find hotels & villas

Why Sri Lanka?

What Makes Sri Lanka Unique


What Others Say about Sri Lanka....

"Undoubtedly the finest island of its size in the world" - Marco Polo

"I fell in love with the country, the people, and the way of life" - Leonard Woolf

"Its stones are rubies and sapphires, amomum scent its marshes, and cinnamon the forests, and the most common plants furnish precious perfumes; elephants run there in herds…while brilliant peacocks and the bird of Paradise occupy the place of our rooks and swallows” - from Illustrations of Dutch Ceylon

“The island of Sri Lanka is a small universe, it contains as many variations of culture, scenery and climate as some countries a dozen times its size…I find it hard to believe that there is any country which scores so highly in all departments – which has so many advantages and so few disadvantages. Lovely beaches, beautiful landscapes, impressive ruins, a vibrant culture and charming people, no wonder Sri Lanka is a small miracle.” – Arthur C. Clarke
Sri Lanka will surprise and delight. It is a country with a long and proud history. You’ll be amazed at the diversity of landscapes, climates and things you can see and do within small travel distances. We will help you create a great trip, ensuring you take in all the sights and experiences…

Ceylon Tea
Sri Lanka is home to the best tea in the world and is one of the largest exporters. Learn about the great tea industry,  meet planters in their homes, walk through lush green manicured tea fields, understand and learn the ancient art of making tea, take an old tea train through the mountains….

Buddhism and the Sacred Tooth Relic
Sri Lanka is a cradle of Buddhism. Monks in robes, temples, temple trees and flowers, chanting, blood red skies, sacred hidden caves, reclining Buddhas, banyan trees, ancient art and iconography depicting scenes from the Ramayana and Mahavansa chronicles….

Gems: The Tear Drops of Buddha
“The interior of this mountain (Adam’s Peak) produces red rubies, blue sapphires, yellow oriental topaz, and other gems; they have each and every precious stone. Whenever heavy rain occurs, the water rushes out of the earth and flows down amidst the sand, and the people search in the sand for the stones. They say that the precious stones are the crystallized tears of Buddha.”

Wonders of the Ancient World
There are 5 UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the Cultural Triangle alone. Sigiriya Rock is a great fortress built in the 5th century AD by King Kasyapa who murdered his father to behold his kingdom. In 14 years he built a great fortress in the sky, to protect himself from the rightful heir, his brother, who had sworn revenge and returned from India to fight an epic battle unto death with armies of warrior elephants. The ancient cities of Anuradhapura, Polonnaruwa, hidden monasteries, cave temples and sacred rocks. The scattered ruins of one of the ancient world’s greatest civilizations await… Indiana Jones eat your heart out!

Extraordinary Wildlife
Sri Lanka is amongst the most bio-diverse countries in the world, and a little known fact is that it has the world’s largest density of leopards in Yala National Park. Monkeys, crocs, elephants, innumerable species of birds, lizards, deer… The Horton Plains in the mountains at 1800 meters look like the African savannah whilst Uda Wallawwe National Park is ripped by the Wallawwe River where you swim by the camp site every morning and enjoy views of the interior mountains.

The Story of Spices and Sri Lanka’s Colonial Heritage
500 years of colonization by the Portuguese, the British and the Dutch have left the remains of beautiful colonial architecture and period furniture. A journey around Sri Lanka is an opportunity to understand how the prospect of extraordinary profit attracted and confronted Europe’s colonial powers. Understanding the anthropology of Sri Lanka with communities like the Burghers of European descent or the Kaffirs, descendants of African slaves who were brought here by the Portuguese and Dutch to build their forts and bastions. The impact of colonisation on Sri Lanka’s customs, language and food bare their mark on Sri Lanka…

Palm-fringed Beaches
Sri Lanka has excellent beaches all around the island and they are all very different. Whales and dolphins can be seen in Kalpitiya and Mirissa. Fishing communities abound all around the coastline. Explore the wide open beaches of Bentota or the shell-shaped coves further south in Tangalle. Dive to the depths of the ocean to explore numerous shipwrecks and amazing coral reefs. Or try world-class surfing in Hikkaduwa or Arugam Bay…

Bawa: A Prolific and Inventive Architect
Geoffrey Bawa was one of the most important architects of the 20th century. He built many private homes, 12 spectacular hotels, and a university campus. Bawa has legions of disciples who spread his style around the world. He died in 2003 at 84. A journey around Sri Lanka is a chance to connect with the works and vision of this extraordinary man.

 

Festivals and Special Occasions


What Others Say about Sri Lanka....

"Undoubtedly the finest island of its size in the world" - Marco Polo

"I fell in love with the country, the people, and the way of life" - Leonard Woolf

"Its stones are rubies and sapphires, amomum scent its marshes, and cinnamon the forests, and the most common plants furnish precious perfumes; elephants run there in herds…while brilliant peacocks and the bird of Paradise occupy the place of our rooks and swallows” - from Illustrations of Dutch Ceylon

“The island of Sri Lanka is a small universe, it contains as many variations of culture, scenery and climate as some countries a dozen times its size…I find it hard to believe that there is any country which scores so highly in all departments – which has so many advantages and so few disadvantages. Lovely beaches, beautiful landscapes, impressive ruins, a vibrant culture and charming people, no wonder Sri Lanka is a small miracle.” – Arthur C. Clarke
The Sri Lankan year is awash with colourful celebrations, festivals and wildlife events that are worth travelling to the island for. These range from cultural events such as the annual Literary Festival and the Art Biennale, to religious events such as Diwali and Vesak full moon day in May when the whole country comes alight with stunning hand-made paper lanterns, to special times for seeing wildlife, such as the sloth bears in Yala in June and July, and the blue whales from November to March on the south coast and from April to October on the east coast.

JANUARY

Full moon day – Kelaniya Duruthu Perahera
A perahera procession based around the Buddhist Kelaniya temple. It comprises three processions featuring dancers, musicians, devotees and elephants.

FEBRUARY

4th – National Independence Day
Sri Lanka’s Independence Day is celebrated on the 4th of February to commemorate its internal political independence from British rule in 1948. The day is a national holiday in Sri Lanka and celebrated all over the country through flag-hoisting ceremonies, dances, and parades.

Gangaramaya Navam Perahera Procession
The Gangaramaya temple, close to Beira Lake, is one of the most famous in Colombo. It is worth a visit to see the collection of antiques and old manuscripts. From the 6th-7thof February there will also be a perahera procession when ornately decorated elephants, fire dancers and drummers parade through the surrounding streets.

Full Moon Poya Day
It is well worth visiting a Buddhist temple on poya or full moon day. The best time to go is in the early evening around 7pm. This is the most sacred day of the month for Buddhists and families visit their local temple placing fresh scented flowers before the Buddha statues, lighting oil lamps and burning incense in worship.

MARCH

Full Moon Poya Day
It is well worth visiting a Buddhist temple on poya or full moon day. The best time to go is in the early evening around 7pm. This is the most sacred day of the month for Buddhists and families visit their local temple placing fresh scented flowers before the Buddha statues, lighting oil lamps and burning incense in worship.

APRIL

April is a holiday month in Sri Lanka where the Sinhalese and Tamil communities celebrate the dawning of the New Year. Celebrations and traditional rituals are best seen in the rural areas. Colombo empties out during this time when most escape to the cooler hills or the sandy beaches. In anticipation of the holiday rush, Nuwara Eliya (the upcountry hill station) spruces itself up and various activities are held. For those heading to the southern beaches, whale and dolphin spotting is a fun experience at this time of the year, offered by the Mirissa Watersports Centre based in the Mirissa harbour.

Full Moon Poya Day
It is well worth visiting a Buddhist temple on poya or full moon day. The best time to go is in the early evening around 7pm. This is the most sacred day of the month for Buddhists and families visit their local temple placing fresh scented flowers before the Buddha statues, lighting oil lamps and burning incense in worship.

Whale & Dolphin Spotting in Mirissa and Kalpitiya
The whale and dolphin watching season runs from November to April. You have a 90% chance of seeing blue whales, sperm whales and dolphins when you travel out to sea by boat from Mirissa or Kalpitiya.

Nuwara Eliya Holiday Season
The Nuwara Eliya season begins during the Sinhalese and Tamil New Year holiday period when Colombo’s residents flock to the hills for the holidays to escape the pre-monsoon heat – another tradition that stretches back to the British colonial period. The 10-day holiday period includes horse races, motocross rallies, flower exhibitions, concerts and revelry late into the night. Several golf tournaments are held in April including the Stableford Competition for Ladies and Gents at the Nuwara Eliya Club. Motor Races include the Mahagastota and Radella Hill Climbs.

13th / 14th – Sinhala & Tamil New Year (celebrated island-wide)
Over these two days the Sinhalese and Tamil communities celebrate the dawning of the New Year. It’s a time when families get together to conduct traditional rituals, religious ceremonies, offer thanks for a good rice harvest, and wish peace and prosperity to all for the coming new year.

Adam’s Peak Butterfly Migration
Observe the spectacular hill-country migration of a myriad of butterflies that take flight towards the summit of Adam’s Peak also known as Samanala Kanda (butterfly mountain). About 65 species of butterflies have been observed over the years.

Nuwara Eliya Flower Show
If you are in this old hill station on the 20th of April, you might like to go along to the flower show. Hundreds of varieties are grown in the fertile soil around the town and also exported.

MAY

- Vesak

Vesak is the most important full moon day in the Sri Lankan Buddhist calendar. It is a time when the birth, enlightenment and passing away of Lord Buddha are remembered. Around the country people make beautiful paper lanterns that they hang outside their homes, temples everywhere are lit with hundreds of oil lamps and roads are lined with flickering torches. It is one of the most magical festivals of the year and we would highly recommend visiting a temple during this time.

Surfing in Arugam Bay
May marks the beginning of the Arugam Bay surf season when seasoned pros come from around the world to master the waves of what is considered to be one of the top ten surf spots in the world.

Whale Watching in Trincomalee
The whale-watching season on the east coast runs from May to October. Head out from Trincomalee harbour on a boat and you are likely to see blue whales and dolphins. Ancient mariners and authors such as Ptolemy wrote about the presence of whales here thousands of years ago.

Kitesurfing in Kalpitiya
Kalpitiya on the northwest coast, a three-hour drive from Colombo, is becoming increasingly well known as a kite surfing destination. May is when the season starts. There are centres here where you can have lessons.

JUNE

- Poson Poya
Poson is an important full moon day that falls in June. Buddhism was first introduced to Sri Lanka in 247 BC when Mahinda, the son of King Asoka of India, appeared before the Sri Lankan King, Devampiyatissa, in Mihintale and spoke to him of the Buddha’s teachings.

If you are in the Anuradhapura area during this time, it is well worth visiting Mihintale temple, which is the main pilgrimage site. Hundreds of people come from around the country to pay their respects.

Sloth Bear Season in Yala and Wasgamuwa National Parks
The sloth bear, also found in the subcontinent, is one of the most elusive ‘big game’ in Sri Lanka. Although found in most National Parks, Yala is the best place to spot the bears. They are most commonly seen in June and July when their favourite fruit, “palu”, is in season.

JULY

Vel Festival, Colombo
Decorated chariots, vibrant music and devotees in penance are an exotic sight on the streets of Colombo during the Hindu Vel Festival. A chariot carrying statues of Lord Murugan and his two wives Valli Ammai and Theivayaanai leaves the Sammaankodu Sri Kathirvelaayuthaswamy temple in Sea Street in the morning and reaches the Sammaankodu Sri Maanikka Vinayagar temple at night. It passes through York Street, Echelon Square and Galle Road to Bambalapitiya, which has been the route for the annual Vel festival for more the 100 years. 

July – August – Kataragama Festival

Over this two-week period devotees of all creeds take part in religious festivals. Kataragama is a multi-religious sacred city – as well as the temples revered by Buddhists and Hindus, there is also an Islamic mosque.

In spite of the differences of caste and creed, many Sri Lankans show great reverence to God Kataragama. They honor him as a very powerful deity and beg divine help to overcome their personal problems or for success in business enterprises.

During the festival there are spectacular perahera processions of elephants and dancers, as well as water cutting ceremonies. Thousands of pilgrims camp in the grounds surrounding the temple. Many of these have completed the pada yatra pilgrimage over two months and have walked all the way from Jaffna.

 - Ramadan
The Islamic holy month of Ramadan begins. Participating Muslims refrain from eating and drinking during daylight hours. This time is intended to teach patience, spirituality and humility.

July – August – Esala Perahera
The Dalada festival in Kandy is the highlight of the Sri Lankan cultural calendar.  This is the festival of Lord Buddha’s tooth and in the final Randoli perahera procession it is carried upon a grandly decorated elephant.

Smaller peraheras are conducted concurrently at Kotte (8 km from Colombo), Bellanwila (13 km from Colombo), Lunawa (16 km from Colombo), Ratnapura (90 km from Colombo) and in the hill country in the towns of: Hanguranketa, Devinuwara, and Mahiyangana. 

Pada Yatra
The pada yatra is a pilgrimage that takes devotees from Jaffna in the far north of the country to Kataragama in the deep south. This takes over two months. The pilgrims arrive at Kataragama in time for the festival.

AUGUST

Elephant Gathering in Minneriya National Park (August & September)
On a jeep safari in Minneriya National Park, close to Sigiriya, witness the largest gathering of elephants in the world when up to 450 of the animals can come to drink at the tank (man-made lake) at one time. There is also a wealth of birdlife, leopards, wild boar and deer to be spotted.

Bellanwila Perahera
A cultural procession livening the outskirts of the city of Colombo, with colourful music, ethnic dances and magnificent elephants in parade. The procession is centred around the Bellanwila Rajamaha Viharaya.

OCTOBER

- Navarathri Festival
A Hindu festival spanning nine nights of worship of the varied forms of the Goddess Durga. It also commemorates the victory of Durga over the demon Mahishasura.

 - Eid-Ul Adha
“Festival of Sacrifice” or “Greater Eid” is an important religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide to commemorate the willingness of Abraham to sacrifice his son Ishmael (Ismail) as an act of obedience to God, before God intervened to provide him with a sheep to sacrifice instead.

NOVEMBER

- Deepavali
The Hindu festival of lights signifying the triumph of good over evil.

Bird watching season begins
Sri Lanka becomes a bird watcher’s paradise wit migrant birds landing between November and March.

Sri Pada (Adam’s Peak) Pilgrimage

The annual Sri Pada (Adam’s Peak) Pilgrimage Season begins in November, with devotees making the ascent to the 7362 ft. (2245 mt.) summit up until the advent of the southwest monsoon in April/May. The peak is crowned by the impression of a gigantic footprint, which is venerated by pilgrims of all religions. Buddhists pay homage to it as that of Lord Buddha, made during his third visit to the island; Hindus believe the Creative Dance of Siva made it while Muslims and Christians believe it to be that of Adam, with Roman Catholics sometimes attributing it to St. Thomas.

Whale and Dolphin Watching
Between November and April head an hour out to sea from Mirissa harbour on the south-west coast and you are certain to see blue whales migrating, as well as sperm whales, dolphins and turtles. A magnificent sight, blue whales spouting water into the air before diving into the depths.

DECEMBER

Stilt Fishing on the southwest coast

Between Koggala and Ahangama admire the incredibly agile stilt fishermen who perch on sticks in the sea in the early morning and late afternoon. This scene has become a national icon.

25th  -  Christmas
Christmas is celebrated in Sri Lanka in true style, with all the traditional trappings – except snow – and is eagerly anticipated by those of all religions as a time of revelry. Indeed, the week leading up to the dawn of the New Year is one long extended period of goodwill and merry-making.